“Crosswise” Nominated For An Anthony Award!

I was blown away to find out that my first Tommy & Shayna Crime Caper, CROSSWISE, was nominated for the “Best Novella” Anthony Award. The Anthony Awards will be voted on by attendees at the 2017 Bouchercon world mystery convention being held in Toronto from October 12 to 15. I’m thrilled to share the honor with fellow nominees Angel Luis Colon, Sarah M. Chen, John Shepphird and B.K. Stevens.

Thanks to everybody for the kind notes of congratulations!

If you haven’t read CROSSWISE yet, it’s a crossword puzzle-themed crime caper that follows the misadventures of disgraced NYPD officer Tommy Ruzzo. Things spiral out of control when Ruzzo chases his girlfriend to Florida where he’s named Head of Security for a beachfront retirement community populated by wisecracking New Yorkers. Ruzzo is stranded among the local losers until he discovers a murdered senior citizen on the bocce ball court.

The second Tommy & Shayna Crime Caper, CROSSED BONES, was just published last week by Down & Out Books.

In addition to the Anthony Award nomination, CROSSWISE is currently in the running for a Silver Falchion Reader’s Choice Award. That one is open for public voting now, and anybody can vote (CLICK HERE). Winners will be announced at the 2017 Killer Nashville Guest of Honor and Awards Banquet August 24 to 27.

S.W. Lauden writes the Greg Salem punk rock P.I. series including BAD CITIZEN CORPORATION and GRIZZLY SEASON (Rare Bird Books). His Tommy & Shayna Crime Caper novellas include CROSSWISE and CROSSED BONES (Down & Out Books). He is the co-host of the Writer Types podcast. Steve lives in Los Angeles.

David Nemeth Reviews “Crossed Bones”

Very happy to wake up to this review today over at Unlawful Acts. Based on his many book reviews, it seems like Mr. Nemeth and I have very similar tastes in crime fiction. Always interesting (and a little terrifying) when somebody like that reviews one of your books.

“Crossed Bones is the adult version of a carnival ride and Lauden’s writing keeps us grounded even as we plunge into the absurdity of costumed pirates battling a motorcycle gang for a lost treasure.”

You can read the full review HERE.

S.W. Lauden is the author of the Greg Salem punk rock P.I. series including BAD CITIZEN CORPORATION and GRIZZLY SEASON (Rare Bird Books). His Tommy & Shayna Crime Caper novellas include CROSSWISE and CROSSED BONES (Down & Out Books). He is also the co-host of the Writer Types podcast. Steve lives in Los Angeles.

Pub Day For “Crossed Bones”

My second Tommy & Shayna Crime Caper is available TODAY thanks to the nice people at Down & Out Books!

And the reviews are starting to come in. Here’s what Dan Malmon over at Crimespree Magazine had to say about CROSSED BONES:

“Lauden is clearly playing with every trope in the drawer with this series of novellas. With every nod, wink, and smile that he sends through the page to the reader, you know he’s having an absolute blast with this series.”

Sounds about right. Please check out that review and click right HERE to check out CROSSED BONES on Amazon.

S.W. Lauden is the author of the Greg Salem punk rock P.I. series including BAD CITIZEN CORPORATION and GRIZZLY SEASON (Rare Bird Books). His Tommy & Shayna Crime Caper novellas include CROSSWISE and CROSSED BONES (Down & Out Books). He is also the co-host of the Writer Types podcast. Steve lives in Los Angeles.

Interrogation—Marietta Miles

Who: Marietta Miles

What: Born in Alabama, raised in Louisiana, her short stories have been published by Thrills, Kills and Chaos, Flash Fiction Offensive, Yellow Mama, Revolt Daily and more. She has stories in anthologies offered through Static Movement Publishing, Horrified Press, and, soon, Gutter Books. Her first novel, ROUTE 12, is now available through All Due Respect Books.

Where: Virginia

Interview conducted by email. Some questions and answers have been edited.

Your debut release from All Due Respect is ROUTE 12, two novellas set in Appalachia in the seventies and eighties. Why was this era and that location the right time and place for these stories and characters?

Poverty is the wolf at the door in ROUTE 12, ordeals borne directly from need. The seventies were a particularly difficult time in Appalachia. Slashed jobs in the mines, bad soil on the farms, and stripped cuts along the mountains made for little money. As they had been for years, young people were leaving in waves. This area, at that time, seemed isolated and vulnerable, much like the characters.

Plus, I got to listen to loads of cheesy seventies music and tell everyone it was for inspiration. I mean come on…The Raspberries?

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Interrogation—William E. Wallace

WEW with gunsWho: William E. Wallace

What: A former award-winning investigative reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle, Naval intelligence analyst, private eye, house painter, cook, dishwasher, magazine writer and journalism professor. His most recent book, DEAD HEAT WITH THE REAPER, was released by All Due Respect books in August 2015. His short fiction has appeared in All Due Respect, Shotgun Honey, Out of the Gutter Online, Near to the Knuckle, Over My Dead Body, Dead Guns, Plan B, Spinetingler and Dark Corners.

Where: Oakland

Interview conducted by email. Some questions and answers have been edited.

The first of the two novellas in DEAD HEAT WITH THE REAPER is called “Legacy”. Is the character Frank Trask based on anybody specific?

Trask is an amalgam of a number of people I’ve met, but he is primarily modeled on my own father, a construction mechanic and blacksmith who drank heavily and died in 1994. In fact, the backhanding of the biker, one of the incidents of violence in the story involving Trask, is based on a confrontation my dad once had with a drunk who was bothering my late sister in a bar in Pollock Pines, California.

The second novella in DEAD HEAT WITH THE REAPER, “The Creep,” features a disfigured vet named Alan Baldocchi. What was your inspiration?

I just wondered what it would be like if a young woman fortuitously crossed paths with somebody who was  so ugly that he made the hair on the back of your neck stand on end, but came to realize he was actually not a “creep” at all—just a person unlucky enough to be really horrible looking. I wrote the first scene where Susan meets Baldocchi on the stairway and set it aside. A while later I read through what I had written and the story began to suggest itself in my mind.

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