“Writer Types” Podcast—Episode 1

Thrilled to share the first episode of my new podcast with co-host, Eric Beetner.

This week we have interviews with authors Megan Abbott, Lou Berney and Steph Post; check in with Down & Out Books publisher, Eric Campbell; hear about the best of 2016 and what to look forward to in 2017 from our reviewers, Kate Malmon and Dan Malmon; enjoy a live reading of the short story “Whoops” by Nick Kolakowski, and have a little bookstore fun with S.G. Redling, Gary Phillips and Jay Stringer.

We’re aiming to have a new episode up every month throughout 2017. So please give it a listen and share it with your friends.

2016: My Year In Interviews

rsz_screen_shot_2016-12-13_at_33555_pm

I got the not-so-original idea to interview other writers at Bouchercon, Long Beach a couple of years ago. At the time, I was new to the vibrant crime and mystery community and eager to learn about the people who were a few steps—or a few miles—ahead of rsz_screen_shot_2016-05-08_at_74929_amme in their publishing journey. Since then I have expanded my interviews to include a handful of publishers, event organizers, designers and bloggers.

I discovered pretty quickly that even the most hardboiled author was happy to indulge my questions, giving them serious consideration and, when asked, providing insightful advice about writing, publishing and marketing. This is a truly talented bunch of people. And a lot of them are funny too.

Two years later, I’m happy to say that many have become friends that I connect with regularly on social media, at annual conferences like Left Coast Crime, Noir at the Bar events around the country, and bookstore signings.

rsz_screen_shot_2016-04-08_at_75943_pm_2Looking back on 2016, I did 48 interviews. If you missed any of them, or if you’re looking to discover a talented new crime/mystery author, here they are again (along with links):

January:

Corey Lynn Fayman, Leslie Bohem, Jack Getze, Ingrid Willis

rsz_screen_shot_2016-01-24_at_50801_pmFebruary:

John L. Thompson, Rob Hart, J.L. Abramo, Bill Fitzhugh, J.T. Lindroos

March:

Brett Battles, Brian Thornton, Michael Lister, Gary Phillips

April:

rsz_screen_shot_2016-01-17_at_83408_amMarietta Miles, Jon Jordan, Jeff Newberry, C.S. Dewildt

May:

Christian Lee, Jen Conley, Glen Erik Hamilton, Sarah M. Chen

June:

Larry Wilson, Bryon Quertermous, Dharma Kelleher, Ryan Gattis, Joe Clifford

July:

rsz_screen_shot_2016-06-26_at_73433_pmBenjamin Whitmer, Jason Pinter, Greg Barth

August:

Mike Creeden, Nick Kolakowski, Erik Storey, Gabino Iglesias, Mike McCrary

September:

Alex Segura, Ro Cuzon, Erik Arenson

rsz_screen_shot_2016-09-05_at_34632_pmOctober:

Jay Stringer, S.G. Redling, Christa Faust & Gary Phillips, Michael Pool, Naomi Hirahara

November:
Lori Rader-Day, Andrew Nette, Bob Truluck, Angel Luis Colon

December:

Matt Coyle, Jonathan Brown

I look forward to interviewing more of you in 2017. Thanks for a great year!

grizzly-seasonS.W. Lauden’s debut novel, BAD CITIZEN CORPORATION, is available from Rare Bird Books. The second Greg Salem novel, GRIZZLY SEASON, was published on October 11, 2016. His Tommy Ruzzo novella, CROSSWISE, is available from Down & Out Books.

Interrogation—S.G. Redling

fb_img_1476026447466Who: S.G. Redling

What: Author of over a half-dozen novels, including the thriller FLOWERTOWN and the sci-fi drama, DAMOCLES. A former radio host, Sheila now spends her non-writing time traveling and arguing with her cats about traveling. Her latest novel is AT RISK.

Where: West Virginia

Interview conducted by email. Some questions and answers have been edited.

Congrats on your fantastic new novel, AT RISK. Can you tell us a little about how this one came about?

AT RISK is a departure for me from my previous thrillers. I gravitate toward protagonists who are less traditional—women with occasionally questionable hygiene, a love of profanity, and a warm flirtation with substance abuse. (The first person who says “Write what you know” gets punched in the face.) As you know, writing is all about trying new things, pushing yourself a little farther. I didn’t know if I could write a protag who was, by all appearances, pulled together. Colleen is polite, reserved, tasteful. On the inside, however, she is a complete disaster, the core of her confidence beaten to pieces by her violent first marriage. She challenged me and surprised me.

On a sad side note, from which I promise I will pull back, I finished this book as my mother was dying. I didn’t know if I could do it. In some ways it felt as if I was writing on scabs. On the other hand, I reaffirmed that writing really is my solace. Still, there are parts of this story that feel alien to me, written by some part of me that writes on when everything else is falling apart. On the up side, I think my mother is delighted that I finally wrote a hero who is comfortable in sweater sets and pearls.

Continue reading